Turning the Pages

May 28, 2009 § 1 Comment

vesalius-p559The National Library of Medicine hosts a great web project called Turning the Pages. Using a flash-based interface, they let you read old medical tomes like Andreas Vesalius’s De Humani Corporis Fabrica and Ambroise Paré’s Oeuvres by literally turning the pages. The books are also filled with curator’s notes on the text and illustrations. This is as close as most of us will get to a hands-on experience. Excellent!

The illustration above is from page 559 of De Humani Corporis Fabrica.

1800s Surgical Kit Explained

May 21, 2009 § 1 Comment

unboxing1Head over to MedGadget to see what’s hiding in this 19th century surgical kit. A fascinating look at pre-anesthesia surgery with Dr. Laurie Slater, editor of medical antiques website Phisick.

Historical medical films on YouTube

February 25, 2009 § 3 Comments

The Wellcome Library, which catalogues books, manuscripts, archives, films and pictures on the history of medicine, has started to make their historical medical films available on YouTube.

Over 100 hours of historical films and video is going to be digitized. As of now, 25 videos have been published, the subject matter ranging from public health information on obesity in children to descriptions of surgical procedures, like the removal of a tuberculoma of the brain, shown above.

A great source of both medical history and the history of visual communication in medicine!

Thanks to Thomas for the tip.

A Healing Passion

October 30, 2008 § 6 Comments

The Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow.

The Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow. Photo by Øystein Horgmo © All rights reserved.

This weekend I was visiting a friend in Glasgow and found the time to see the Hunterian Museum. It has a permanent exhibition called “A Healing Passion“, dedicated to the impact of Glasgow and Western Scotland on medicine. « Read the rest of this entry »

Triangulation

September 25, 2008 § 3 Comments

Alexis Carrel

Alexis Carrel

The history of surgery is the history of great ideas and inventions. Ideas so outrageous, no one had dared to imagine them, before someone did. Like using a piece of intestine to replace a cancerous oesophagus. Inventions so ingenious in their simplicity, the rest of the surgical world must have gone “why didn’t I think of that”, when they were introduced.

One of the most brilliant inventions is, in my opinion, the triangulation method for suturing blood vessels. « Read the rest of this entry »

The Making of Modern Medicine

March 28, 2008 § Leave a comment

BBC - The Making of Modern Medicine

I’ve just finished listening to the BBC Radio series “The Making of Modern Medicine”. A total of 30 programmes about the development of medicine from the ancient Greece to the scientific medicine of today. « Read the rest of this entry »

Paean to the pean

March 14, 2008 § 8 Comments

Pean artery forceps

Hemostat, artery forceps, hemostatic clamp, artery clamp – this beautiful surgical instrument has many names. In Scandinavia it’s simply called a “peang” (pronounced [piaŋ]). For a long time I’ve wondered why we call it that. Here’s the story. « Read the rest of this entry »

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