Fujifilm X-T1 IR Quick Test

May 2, 2016 § Leave a comment

Photos by Øystein H. Horgmo © All rights reserved.

Photos by Øystein H. Horgmo © All rights reserved.

We received the Fujifilm X-T1 IR for testing this week. I did a quick test shoot of the back of  my hand to show what it can do compared to a normal camera. « Read the rest of this entry »

CIR Annual Report

March 22, 2016 § Leave a comment

My department shoots lots of photos for the annual reports of different medical research institutes. For the 2015 annual report of the Centre for Immune Regulation (CIR) I made several conceptual photomontages that were used on the front page and as chapter separators. Check them out above.

I also shot the 2014 report, which can be viewed here.

Mirrors in Early Clinical Photography

February 1, 2016 § 4 Comments

sterileeye-mirrors

Left: Wikimedia Commons. Right: National Museum of Health and Medicine. Creative Commons.

I have published a paper in the Journal of Visual Communication in Medicine called Mirrors in Early Clinical Photography (1862-1882): A Descriptive Study.

Abstract:
In the mid-19th century, photographers used mirrors to document different views of a patient in the same image. The first clinical photographs were taken by portrait photographers. As conventions for clinical photography were not yet established, early clinical photographs resemble contemporary portraits. The use of mirrors in clinical photography probably originated from the portrait studios, as several renowned photographers employed mirrors in their studio portraits. Clinical photographs taken for the US Army Medical Museum between 1862 and 1882 show different ways of employing this mirror technique.

The full article is available at Taylor & Francis Online.

If you are interested in reading the full article and do not have access, please contact me.

Here is an interview with me about the article (in Norwegian).

Here is a blog post on the same subject I posted a few years back.

More photos with mirrors can be found on the National Museum of Health & Medicine’s Flickr-page.

 

Errata:
Reference 13 is incorrectly attributed to the University of California. The correct reference is:

Pitts T. William Bell: Philadelphia photographer [Master thesis]. Tucson: University of Arizona; 1987:12-25.

The document is available online here.

 

Early medical photography reenacted

April 19, 2015 § Leave a comment

Photo: Vidar Ibenfeldt © 2015. Used with kind permission.

Photo: Vidar Ibenfeldt © 2015. Used with kind permission.

Last weekend I attended the Norwegian Institutional Photographer’s annual conference in Bergen. The most interesting happening was a reenactment of what must be one of the first instances of standardized medical photography in Norway.
« Read the rest of this entry »

Another way to focus

July 4, 2014 § Leave a comment

I have always used to auto focus by pressing the shutter release half way down. Focus, re-compose and shoot. But six months ago I tried changing to back button focusing, after watching the video above. I haven’t gone back. « Read the rest of this entry »

Sanctuary

January 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

Photo by Kathy Phillips, U.S. National Archives. Public domain.

A young father bottle-fed his 15-day-old son in our waiting room. The son had a rare syndrome and the bottle was fitted to his condition. Milk was spilling out. The father kept on feeding, talking to his son and wiping his chin. « Read the rest of this entry »

Click the Sick

January 2, 2014 § 2 Comments

Kaushik Ghosh is ready to shoot an orthopaedic surgery (Photo: Sayantan Bera)

Kaushik Ghosh is ready to shoot an orthopaedic surgery (Photo: Sayantan Bera)

The latest issue of Down To Earth, India’s only science and environment fortnightly runs an article about medical photography. The journalist chose to open the piece with some quotes from posts I’ve done here on The Sterile Eye.

The article examines the state of medical photography in India today and the interview with Kaushik Ghosh, one of the country’s few trained medical photographers, is especially interesting.

Read the article in Down To Earth here.

If you want to read the quoted blog posts in full, go to A Sudden Jolt of Sadness and The Opposite of Fashion.

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